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This Is the World’s Oldest Image of a Ghost

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(credit: Photograph: The British Museum)

A curator exploring the shadowy recesses of the British Museum’s archives recently encountered a ghost—or rather, the world’s oldest image of one, etched onto a 3,500-year-old Babylonian clay tablet. The figure of a tall, emaciated spirit with his hands bound illustrates the text of an ancient exorcism ritual meant to banish the sort of ghost that “seizes hold of a person and pursues him and cannot be loosed.”

Irving Finkel, the curator of the British Museum’s Middle Eastern department and a specialist in cuneiform, the angular writing system of the ancient Babylonian civilization, recently translated the text of the ritual, which had remained unread and ignored since the British Museum acquired the tablet in the 1800s. At that time, museums across Europe were in a rush to stockpile Babylonian artifacts, and curators would often pay local people to loot clay and stone tablets, along with other artifacts, from archaeological sites in what is now Iraq. Most of those items arrived with little or no information about their context and ended up in storage.

Seeing ghosts

The ghost tablet, for example, had never been displayed to the public, and no one had translated its text. Nor had anyone noticed the hidden ghostly image on the reverse side of the clay tablet, either. That side appears blank until it’s viewed under a light at just the right angle, when the image of the ghost seems to leap out at the viewer.

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Original Post: arstechnica.com

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Omnitrak’s National City Pride Survey Uncancels Top Metro Destinations

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New York Ranks #1, Followed by San Diego, Los Angeles, Nashville, Seattle; Urban Life Reconstitutes New Communities, Including Cats and Dogs

(PRWeb February 18, 2022)

Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/omnitraks_national_city_pride_survey_uncancels_top_metro_destinations/prweb18505132.htm

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First-Ever App-based Platform for Men’s Health Now Available In…

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Bastion Health, the first-ever comprehensive app-based telehealth platform for men’s health specializing in reproductive and prostate health, is now available to Florida residents.

(PRWeb January 13, 2022)

Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/2022/1/prweb18422689.htm

Source Here: prweb.com

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Ships From 1,581 Ports May Go to Antarctica, Bringing Unwanted Guests

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Enlarge / Tourist boats could potentially bring invasive species to the Antarctic region. (credit: Andrew Peacock)

Right now, the Antarctic and the waters around it are surprisingly free of invasive species. According to new research, however, that situation might change in the not-too-distant future, thanks to a shocking level of connectivity with ports across the world. Ships can accidentally carry a large array of marine life, which can in turn colonize new places (like the world’s polar south), outcompete native life, and generally wreak havoc on an ecosystem. New research has traced the paths of the various research vessels, tourist ships, and fishing boats that chug along through the icy waters of the Antarctic.

According to Arlie McCarthy, a researcher in the University of Cambridge’s Department of Zoology and the British Antarctic Survey, these watercraft all carry with them a risk of unwanted visitors. And the visitors may have more chances to relocate than we once thought.

“We know from other cold areas in the world, including the Arctic, that things growing on the hulls of ships absolutely do get transported from place to place, and it is one of the major sources of marine introductions around the world,” McCarthy told Ars. “We also know that ships going into Antarctica do have things growing on them. What we didn’t know until this point was good detail on where those ships go.”

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Original Post: arstechnica.com

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